The Herald Bulletin

Afternoon Update

Nation & World

November 17, 2013

Geithner to join private equity firm

Former U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, who played a central role in the government's response to the financial crisis of 2008-2009, is joining private equity firm Warburg Pincus LLC.

The firm announced Saturday that Geithner will serve as its president and managing director starting March 1.

Geithner led the Federal Reserve Bank of New York for more than five years before becoming Treasury secretary in 2009, when the economy had sunk into a deep recession.

Few Treasury secretaries received as much scrutiny. Supporters credited Geithner with helping prevent the recession from spiraling into a second Great Depression by stabilizing the banking system and restoring investor confidence. Critics said he was too cozy with Wall Street.

Warburg Pincus said that Geithner would advise the firm on strategy, investing, investor relations and other topics. The New York-based firm has been involved in buyouts of such well-known companies as luxury department store chain Neiman Marcus and contact lens maker Bausch + Lomb.

The firm declined to comment on Geithner's compensation. Through an aide, Geithner declined an interview request.

Geithner, 52, stepped down from Treasury in late January, days after President Barack Obama was sworn in for a second term. He was the last of Obama's original economic advisers to leave the administration, and was succeeded as Treasury secretary by Jack Lew.

In an interview with The Associated Press on his last day in office, Geithner said that the economy was "stronger than people appreciate" and predicted a pickup in growth. He defended his role in bailouts for large banks — steps designed to stabilize the financial system — but acknowledged that he would never win over his critics because it was hard to convince people about the dangers posed by the financial crisis.

The official who oversaw taxpayer bailouts of the banks, for example, criticized Geithner for allowing insurance giant American International Group to pay huge bonuses to executives. AIG got the biggest bailout of the financial crisis.

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