The Herald Bulletin

Morning Update

Nation & World

April 23, 2013

More rain expected for swollen Midwest rivers

PEORIA HEIGHTS, Ill. — More rain on Tuesday was the last thing flood fighters across the Midwest wanted to see, adding more water to swollen rivers that are now expected to remain high into next month.

Floodwaters were rising to record levels along the Illinois River in central Illinois. In Missouri, six small levees north of St. Louis were overtopped by the surging Mississippi River, though mostly farmland was affected.

The Mississippi and Illinois rivers have crested in some places, but that doesn't mean the danger is over. The National Weather Service predicts a very slow descent, thanks in part to the additional rain expected to amount to an inch or so across several Midwestern states.

The duration of the flood was becoming a concern.

"The longer the crest, definitely, the more strain there is on the levee," said Mike Petersen, a spokesman for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in St. Louis.

The biggest problem areas were in Illinois, on the Illinois River. Roads and buildings were flooded and riverfront structures were inundated in Peoria Heights. Firefighters feared that if fuel from businesses and vehicles starts to leak, it could spark a fire in areas that could be reached only by boat.

"That's our nightmare: A building burns and we can't get to it," said Peoria Heights Fire Chief Greg Walters. "These are combustible buildings and we have no access to them simply because of the flooding."

About 20 to 30 homes and businesses near the river have been evacuated, he said.

But all things considered, Peoria Heights residents were taking the crisis in stride.

"This is a drill for them," Walters said. "We went down there Friday and Saturday as the water was rising and the neighbors were out there sandbagging like it was a normal day-to-day operation."

In nearby Chillicothe, more than 400 homes have been affected by the flood, said Vicky Turner, director of the Peoria County Emergency Management Agency. Many homes have been evacuated, but others whose owners have had their buildings raised over the years because of flooding have chosen to stay put, Turner said.

"They row back and forth ... up to the main road," she said.

In Missouri, officials in the flood-weary hamlet of Clarksville were optimistic that days of furious sandbagging would hold back the Mississippi. At times toiling in heavy rain, crews built a second wall of dirt and sandbags behind the original barrier, and by Tuesday morning calm was restored. The Mississippi appeared to be receding, ever so slowly, from the community 70 miles north of St. Louis.

"We're feeling much better," Mayor Jo Anne Smiley said. "It is amazing what you can do, and when it doesn't work you go to Plan B, Plan C or Plan D."

There were other snippets of good news elsewhere.

Lucas Schultz, the 12-year-old Smithton, Ill., boy who was rescued from the flood waters of a river in Missouri on Sunday was at home and doing fine.

Lucas was in Leadwood, Mo., trying to cross a bridge with two other boys when he fell into the Big River near a culvert pipe. He was sucked into the pipe, came out the other side and went floating down the river. Resident Robert Salsberry was able to get to him, pull him to safety and perform CPR.

"He's doing a lot better. He had some stitches and lots and lots of bumps and bruises. He got extremely lucky," Yvette Schultz, Lucas' mother, told the Park Hills (Mo.) Daily Journal.

Meanwhile, shipping resumed Tuesday along a 15-mile stretch of the Mississippi near St. Louis after the U.S. Coast Guard determined that 11 barges that sank last weekend were not a hazard to navigation.

Investigators were trying to determine what caused 114 barges to break loose in St. Louis County. Coast Guard Lt. Colin Fogarty said drifting debris that can collect under docked barges may have weighed on the fleet and the lines that secured them to shore.

The Mississippi River crest was still a couple of days away in Dutchtown, Mo., a town of about 100 residents 110 miles south of St. Louis. Town clerk and emergency management director Doyle Parmer said about three dozen members of the Missouri National Guard were helping residents sandbag. He was confident the few homes and businesses would remain dry.

In St. Louis, crews scrambled to stem the flow of millions of gallons of raw sewage that has been pouring into the river since two of three pumps failed at a treatment plant two days earlier.

The plant processes some 110 million gallons of sewage a day; about half of that was being discharged into the river untreated. Many communities downriver draw their drinking water from the Mississippi.

Lance LeComb, a Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District spokesman, said it was unclear how quickly the pumps would be fixed or replaced, but he said the fast-flowing river was diluting the spilled sewage.

In Indiana, flood gates were installed to try and keep the flooding Wabash River from the state's oldest town, Vincennes. Some strategic spots were also being reinforced with sandbags.

The National Weather Service projected a crest on Saturday about 12 feet above flood stage, the highest reading on nearly 70 years at Vincennes, founded in 1732.

In Saginaw County, Mich., water topped the dyke at Misteguay Creek in Spaulding Township. Businesses and homes were flooded along the Tittabawassee River, a Saginaw River tributary. Part of Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge also was under water.

 

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