The Herald Bulletin

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February 6, 2014

US government to spend $30M on forest restoration

HELENA, Mont. — The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Thursday it will spend $30 million this year on forest restoration projects in 12 states to reduce the threat of wildfires, protect water quality and improve wildlife habitat for at-risk species.

Those first 13 projects will be the start of a multi-year initiative to improve the health of forests and watersheds on public and private lands, Agriculture Undersecretary Robert Bonnie said.

With longer fire seasons in recent years burning more areas, and beetle outbreaks devastating more than 40 million acres of forests in the West, the pace and scale of restoration need to be increased, he said.

The work must extend to helping private landowners thin their trees, remove brush, protect habitat and improve watersheds along their properties, Bonnie said.

"If we only worked on our national forests, it wouldn't be enough to address this problem," he said.

Money to work with private landowners will come from the farm bill Congress passed this week, and the Forest Service will use its own funds to work on adjacent public lands.

The Alliance for the Wild Rockies, a nonprofit that has filed several lawsuits to block logging projects in national forests in the Northern Rockies, was skeptical about the plan.

Logging won't help reduce wildfire risks or protect watersheds because areas thinned of trees allow the wind to blow through more easily, which could spread flames more quickly, executive director Mike Garrity said.

The money would be better used by helping landowners in wildland-urban interface areas remove trees and other fuels around their homes, he said.

"If they are going to go out and log around the forests, that's a complete waste of money and it's corporate welfare for the timber industry," Garrity said.

Helena National Forest Supervisor Bill Avey said infrastructure protection is the first priority. Officials don't plan to thin or log every acre, but will identify areas with the highest probability of fire moving through to get rid of the heavy fuels, he said.

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