The Herald Bulletin

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February 5, 2013

CBO: Budget deficit estimated at $845B

WASHINGTON — A new government report is predicting the budget deficit will drop below $1 trillion for the first time in President Barack Obama's tenure in office.

The Congressional Budget Office analysis released Tuesday says the government will run a $845 billion deficit this year, a modest improvement compared to last year's $1.1 trillion shortfall but still enough red ink to require the government to borrow 24 cents of every dollar it spends.

The agency also projects that the economy will grow just 1.4 percent this year if $85 billion in across-the-board spending cuts take effect as scheduled March 1. Unemployment would average 8 percent. Obama wants to ease the cuts by replacing them with new tax revenue and alternative cuts, but a clash is looming with Republicans who insist that last month's tax increase on wealthier earners will be the last tax hike they permit.

The report predicts the deficit would dip to $430 billion by 2015, the lowest since the government posted a $459 billion deficit is former President George W. Bush's last year in office. That would be a relatively low 2.4 percent when measured against the size of the economy. But deficits would move higher after that and again reach near $1 trillion in the latter portion of the 10-year window — despite the recently enacted tax increase on family income exceeding $450,000 and automatic spending cuts of about $100 billion a year. The package of spending cuts and tax increases are punishment for Washington's failure to strike a long-term budget pact.

Over the coming decade, the deficit would total $7 trillion.

The economy will grow slowly in 2013 and more rapidly next year, with unemployment projected to stay high, according to the report.

This year's growth is being hampered by a tax increase enacted in January and by automatic spending cuts scheduled to take effect this spring. CBO projects the economy will grow by just 1.4 percent this year but recover to 3.4 percent next year.

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