The Herald Bulletin

Evening Update

Columns

June 29, 2013

'Big Joe' Clark: The problem isn't the cost of education

Tuition costs have been on the rise. This is likely not news to you but it’s still having a large impact on not only our future generations but also our current economy. According to Mary Kane at Citi, student loan debt makes up nearly a third of all non-mortgage debt in the United States, approximately $1 trillion in total.

From 2002 through 2012, the Higher Education Price Index, which measures the cost of obtaining a college degree, has risen 35 percent; while the Consumer Price Index, a common measure of inflation, during the same time period has gone up just 25 percent. Without serious changes enacted by Congress, it is unlikely we see any substantial transform to the rising tuition trend. The Council on Foreign Relations reported that while the U.S. spends more money than any other developed country on K-12 public education, our students ranked 14th in reading and 25th in math based on the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment survey. Something is broken here and we can’t expect future generations to be able to compete on the global stage unless the education system is fixed. However, one of the things that can be changed is who teaches our children.

Simply improving the quality of the educator has a significant material impact on students. Eric Hanushek of the NBER published a study in 2010 that showed by having a teacher who is above average could improve a student’s lifetime earnings by nearly $400,000. Hanushek also noted that in order to determine the success of a teacher, our school systems must better evaluate the quality of our educators. Unfortunately, current assessment techniques as well as ambiguity in educational policy, according to Hanushek’s research, have not been up to par to effectively accomplish this deferential of teacher performance.

There has been and there will always be those who try to ‘game’ the system. This was one of the faults of No Child Left Behind. When teachers’ compensation is tied to standardized testing scores of their students it’s unrealistic to assume there wouldn’t be cases of teacher-assisted cheating. The problem we face today is like changing a tire on a car that’s still on the road; we must fix the quality of education our children are receiving while they are receiving it.

Text Only
Columns
Featured Ads
More Resources from The Herald Bulletin
AP Video
Raw: More Than 100,000 Gather for Easter Sunday Raw: Greeks Celebrate Easter With "Rocket War" Police Question Captain, Crew on Ferry Disaster Raw: Orthodox Christians Observe Easter Rite Ceremony Marks 19th Anniversary of OKC Bombing Raw: Four French Journalists Freed From Syria Raw: Massive 7.2 Earthquake Rocks Mexico Captain of Sunken SKorean Ferry Arrested Raw: Fire Destroys 3 N.J. Beachfront Homes Raw: Pope Presides Over Good Friday Mass Raw: Space X Launches to Space Station Superheroes Descend on Capitol Mall Man Charged in Kansas City Highway Shootings Obama Awards Navy Football Trophy Anti-semitic Leaflets Posted in Eastern Ukraine Raw: Magnitude-7.2 Earthquake Shakes Mexico City Ceremony at MIT Remembers One of Boston's Finest Raw: Students Hurt in Colo. School Bus Crash Deadly Avalanche Sweeps Slopes of Mount Everest
Parade
Magazine

Click HERE to read all your Parade favorites including Hollywood Wire, Celebrity interviews and photo galleries, Food recipes and cooking tips, Games and lots more.
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Helium debate
Helium
Front page
Poll

Oscar Pistorius' murder trial has gripped South Africa and sports fans worldwide. If he is found guilty of premeditated murder he faces 25 years to life in prison. Do you think he intentionally shot his girlfriend?

Yes
No
Unsure
     View Results