The Herald Bulletin

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Columns

May 10, 2014

Howard Hewitt: Michigan now becoming known for its red wines

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. — The idea of growing wine grapes in northern Michigan was unthinkable 30 years ago. But a few brave pioneers and many producers since have shown wine drinkers, skeptics, and wine competitions around the world the area can produce classy white wines.

Riesling is by far the most planted grape amd the wine has turned heads across the country. Leelanau Peninsula and Old Mission Bay Peninsula have more than 30 wineries. More vineyards are being planted as production soars. Wine production has increased 65 percent in the past eight years, according to the Michigan Liquor Control Commission.

A mid-April visit, following a 2010 introduction to Michigan wine, yielded a surprising surge in red wine quality. The area is still hanging its hat on the Reisling, Pinot Blanc and plenty of fruit wine. But the three primary red wine grapes grown in the cool climate are starting to show enough vine age to produce really good wines. Cabernet Franc has been the best wine and best seller. But Pinot Noir has made great strides.

A tasting panel of two journalists, a sommelier and retailer sang the praises of four Leelanau 100 percent Merlots which were blind tasted for the Northern Michigan Wine Loop.

"We need red grapes here that mature a little bit earlier than varietals like Cabernet Sauvignon," said Paul Hamelin, owner of Verterra Winery in picturesque Leland along Lake Michigan. "What fits here beautifully is Merlot. We can consistently get Merlot, as a Bordeaux wine grape, ripe here.

"We're starting to see the expressions of it now. There are probably a half dozen wineries bottling 100 percent Merlot. You see the depth of the fruit and the character coming out in our Merlot."

The beauty of numerous Merlots I tasted was the bright and fresh fruit without the muddled mid palate of California plonk. The upper-state Michigan Merlot had a nice silky mouth feel and pleasant finish.

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