The Herald Bulletin

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September 29, 2013

Bill Stanczykiewicz: Crisis in counseling low-income students

A recent discovery akin to finding buried treasure reveals the need to provide more support to more students searching for economic opportunity.

During the last school year, low-income high school students enrolled in Indiana’s Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG) program discovered $2.3 million to pay for college and other postsecondary education – more than twice the amount located through JAG in any other state.

The significant success in harvesting postsecondary support did not result from an increase in funding from government, foundations or private donors. The dollars always were there. Instead, the students simply needed help finding and digging up the financial aid.

JAG provides that assistance through an in-school specialist who helps high-risk students map their graduation and career plans, prepare for postsecondary education and then locate available grants and scholarships to achieve those goals.

While new state funding is expanding JAG to more than 100 sites, too many Hoosier students will not receive this high level of personal attention due to a crisis in school counseling. The average school counselor in Indiana serves 539 students – the eighth worst ratio in America. According to College Board, counselors also are assigned additional duties such as administrative paper work, the coordination of testing and other clerical tasks that “pull counselors away from the college and career-going activities they are uniquely suited to provide their students.”

This lack of personal attention has consequences. In a research review conducted for the state’s new Indiana Career Council, the Indiana Business Research Center reported, “K-12 students receive little career guidance, so they’re unsure which courses and programs to pursue.”

Various other surveys in Indiana have discovered: only 26 percent of low-income students know how to apply for need-based financial aid; one of the biggest fears among parents is that they will miss deadlines and other postsecondary opportunities for their children; and 90 percent of school counselors desire more training on topics such as postsecondary options, admission standards and financial aid.

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