The Herald Bulletin

Afternoon Update

Election 2012

November 6, 2012

County sees steady turnout

ANDERSON, Ind. — Barbara Hutton, Republican chair of the Madison County Election Board, said polls “quieted down” in the evening with just “run of the mill” issues. But throughout the day, she said townships like Jackson and Monroe saw heavy turnout. At one point, near noon, Jackson saw an hour wait.

Hutton didn’t have any official turnout numbers, but to give insight into the sort of crowds seen, said Monroe had reported 98 percent of its democrats voting. Some inspectors were estimating 50 percent turnout in their precincts.

“Most places were steady with a few lines,” Hutton said. “Some were hectic.”

Bret Callender voted for the first time and said it felt good.

The 31-year-old Anderson man said he was influenced to vote because so many voters across the country are having their rights challenged.

“That undermines the entire idea of democracy,” said Callender, who cast his ballot Tuesday in Anderson.

He said the presidential race seemed like the most important one because the race is heavily rooted in ideas.

“I have an idea of how the country should be run,” Callender said. “I want to have a say in who does that.”

While there was a glitch that caused some problems for Union Township early in the day, Hutton reported no other voting site problems -- just standard calls about registration and where to vote.

With that earlier glitch, a voter reported being turned away after being told she, along with everyone else in Union Township’s Precinct 2, had already voted absentee.

Hutton said the precinct must have received the wrong list due to a “printing glitch” from the voter registration office but that the problem had been “ironed out” quickly.

The voter registration phone system, though, did have some issues with callers unable to get through earlier in the day, Hutton said. A repair person had been called to take a look at the phone lines.

“If there are any problems we are here to help,” Hutton said of the election board. “Our main project is to make sure every registered voter gets to vote.”

Troy Knight wanted to make a difference, and his way to do that was by voting. The Anderson man said the most important races to him are president, governor and school board.

“With the state of America and our economy, it is important to get out and vote,” Knight said.

Adrienne Lee, of Anderson, said it was important for her voice to be heard.

“There were a lot of people who fought hard for the right for women and blacks to be able to vote,” said Lee, who is black. “There was a long time they couldn’t vote.”

The voting process, she Barbara Hutton, Republican chair of the Madison County Election Board, said “it quieted down” in the evening with just “run of the mill” issues as they closed down polls, such as calls regarding what envelope to use or what form.

Throughout the day, though, she said townships like Jackson and Monroe saw heavy turnout. At one point, near noon, Jackson saw an hour wait.

Hutton didn’t have any official turnout numbers, but to give insight into the sort of crowds seen, said Monroe had reported 98 percent of its democrats voting. Some inspectors were estimating 50 percent of their precinct coming in.

“Most places were steady with a few lines,” she said. “Some were hectic.”

Bret Callender voted for the first time and said it felt good.

The 31-year-old Anderson man said he was influenced to vote because so many voters across the country are having their rights challenged.

“That undermines the entire idea of democracy,” said Callender, who cast his ballot Tuesday in Anderson.

He said the presidential race seemed like the most important one because the race is heavily rooted in ideas.

“I have an idea of how the country should be run,” Callender said. “I want to have a say in who does that.”

While there was a glitch that caused some problems for Union Township early in the day, Hutton reported no other voting site problems -- just standard calls about registration and where to vote.

With that earlier glitch, a voter reported being turned away after being told she, along with everyone else in Union Township’s Precinct 2, had already voted absentee.

Hutton said the precinct must have received the wrong list due to a “printing glitch” from the voter registration office but that the problem had been “ironed out” quickly.

The voter registration phone system, though, did have some issues with callers unable to get through earlier in the day, Hutton said. A repair person had been called to take a look at the phone lines.

“If there are any problems we are here to help,” she said of the election board. “Our main project is to make sure every registered voter gets to vote.”

Troy Knight wanted to make a difference, and his way to do that was by voting. The Anderson man said the most important races to him are president, governor and school board.

“With the state of America and our economy, it is important to get out and vote,” Knight said.

Adrienne Lee, of Anderson, said it was important for her voice to be heard.

“There were a lot of people who fought hard for the right for women and blacks to be able to vote,” said Lee, who is black. “There was a long time they couldn’t vote.”

The voting process, Lee said, went smoothly. said, went smoothly.

 

1
Text Only
Election 2012
  • austin.jpg Democrats will assume role of ‘loyal opposition’

    Even though Republicans will be able to legislate at will when the General Assembly convenes in January, two local Democrat state lawmakers say that only makes their presence for debate more vital.

    November 10, 2012 1 Photo

  • 1107 news Ritz 1 .jpg New state schools superintendent may face limit on power

    Democrat Glenda Ritz won the race for the state’s schools superintendent by challenging the education overhaul implemented by the Republican incumbent Tony Bennett, but her power to stop the sweeping changes in Indiana schools may be limited.

    November 8, 2012 1 Photo

  • 1107 news polls 11.jpg Obama backers say race wasn’t a factor in vote

    Many factors go into choosing a presidential candidate. But is race one of them?
    In Indiana, nearly 90 percent of all blacks — 8 percent of the electorate — voted for Democratic incumbent Barack Obama.

    November 7, 2012 1 Photo

  • elex_donnellywins.jpg Winner Donnelly, losing Republicans assess race

    Democrat Joe Donnelly began the day after his surprising victory in the Indiana Senate race trying to digest what had just happened. And supporters of defeated Republican Richard Mourdock debated what had gone wrong.

    November 7, 2012 1 Photo

  • 1108 news Pence office 002.jpg Pence's Anderson district office to remain open until December

    Officials for 6th Congressional District Rep. Mike Pence, now Gov-elect Pence, said Wednesday that his district office next to the Paramount Theatre Centre will remain open through mid-December to provide constituent services.

    November 7, 2012 1 Photo

  • slides_democrat04.JPG Lanane takes helm of Senate Democrats

    Indiana Senate Democrats have elected Tim Lanane of Anderson to lead their 13-member caucus in General Assembly. Lanane, an Anderson attorney, has served in the Senate since 1997.

    November 7, 2012 1 Photo

  • 1108 news Indiana House 2.jpg House leader pledges no abuse of supermajority power

    The Republicans’ near-sweep of Tuesday’s Indiana House races now gives them power that mirrors the GOP’s long-held supermajority in the state Senate. That shift prompted new Senate Minority Leader Tim Lanane, an Anderson attorney, to offer some advice: “Be careful what you wish for,” Lanane said.

    November 7, 2012 1 Photo

  • elex_pencepresser.jpg Pence pledges to go on with education, tax cut initiatives

    Gov.-elect Mike Pence said he’ll make job creation “job one” when he takes office in January and promised to abide by his campaign’s “Roadmap for Indiana” plan, which includes support for education reforms that voters seemed to reject and a tax cut that legislative leaders oppose.

    November 7, 2012 1 Photo

  • elex_donnellywins.jpg Indiana exit poll: Women aid Donnelly victory

    Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney cruised to victory in Indiana, while Democratic Rep. Joe Donnelly won a closely watched U.S. Senate race and Republican Rep. Mike Pence won the governor's contest.

    November 7, 2012 1 Photo

  • 1023 Mike Pence 02.jpg Pence elected Indiana governor to extend GOP control

    Republican Mike Pence won election Tuesday as Indiana governor, extending his party's control of the state's top office at the same time voters ousted the incumbent GOP state schools superintendent.

    November 7, 2012 1 Photo

Election Video
More Resources from The Herald Bulletin
AP Video
Parade
Magazine

Click HERE to read all your Parade favorites including Hollywood Wire, Celebrity interviews and photo galleries, Food recipes and cooking tips, Games and lots more.
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Helium debate
Helium
Poll

How often would you ride an express bus to Indianapolis?

Every work day
Once or twice a week
Occasionally
I'll stick to driving my car, thank you
     View Results