The Herald Bulletin

Evening Update

Entertainment

March 7, 2013

Q&A with Lori Borgman

National columnist to speak at Pendleton library

PENDLETON, Ind. — Lori Borgman never intended to write a column. She started out as a photojournalist but writing was a lot easier to do than photography with three small children.

“A camera bag weighs enough without having three kids too,” she said with a laugh.

The now nationally syndicated columnist and author of several books was a stay-at-home mom writing freelance when she started writing the column for the Indianapolis Star. Within a couple of years the column was picked up for national distribution.

Borgman said she will always have a debt of gratitude to the Star, who first ran her column. The two had an “amiable parting” several years ago. She said although her column is published throughout the U.S. and Canada, it “still seems odd not to be in my hometown paper.” Readers can find it at her website www.loribogman.com and subscribe to it by email.

She and husband Charlie Nye live in Indianapolis, have three grown children — a son and two daughters — and five grandchildren (with a sixth on the way) all within three years of each other.

She will be speaking Saturday morning at Pendleton Community Library. The goal of her humor column is twofold — present the idea that a family that works tremendously well is a tremendous blessing and that same family can drive you straight up the wall.

Borgman will have copies of her most recent book — “The Death of Commonsense.”

THB: What should those coming to your library presentation expect?

Lori Borgman: There will be nothing educational about it. It will just be family humor. I won’t be sharing the secret to weight loss, how to make a million bucks or how to day trade on the stock market.

I take anywhere from 35 to 50 speaking engagements a year all around the country — an odd assortment of things. I spoke at a cattle breeders dinner — a fish fry, I never understood that, but it was really good fish. I also did a convention for funeral home workers. Next week I’ll be at the Nebraska Women in Ag conference. I don’t farm.

THB: Most journalists don’t start out as columnists. Tell me about how you got to where you are today?

LB: I was a photojournalist first. I started out at the Kansas City Star, worked for the Fargo Forum and the Eugene Register Guard. I was also the editor of a weekly paper somewhere in there in my early 20s. I always wrote at every paper I was a shooter (photojournalist) for. I did photo features where I would do the story and the pictures. Writing just kind of happened.

THB: What is your family’s reaction to seeing stories about them appear in the newspaper? Anything off limits? Do you ask them if it is OK to share?

LB: I’ve never used their names. I always have tried to protect their privacy. There are certain topics I’ve never written about — dating, which would be really funny. I’ve always said my best material goes unused. Relationships with family are more important than a laugh at a column. I try to keep my columns universal — maybe something that happened at my house could have happened at yours. It can’t just be about me and my kids.

THB: How do you come up with ideas for your columns? What are your favorite things to write about?

LB: I wish I knew the answer to that. Sometimes I’m looking at a blank computer screen asking myself the same thing. Then I hear myself telling stories, someone laughs and thinks it is funny. I think, “maybe that’s a column.”

What I write about is very eclectic. I touch on anything that comes under that broad umbrella of family — often it is humorous but sometimes it is serious. Sometimes the serious columns get a bigger response than the humorous ones.

An example of that — the obituary I wrote for common sense. It has been published around the globe. It was a tongue-in-cheek kind of thing.

THB: What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?

LB: I’m not sure who the guy was, but he knew I was writing a column. He told me it was good and to keep it up. And he also said, “If you worry about writing something that will please everyone, you’ll never write anything.”

THB: What is your advice for writers and bloggers trying to break out?

LB: Get a Plan B. It is a very shaky field. I don’t think I could start out now and become me today. The interest is gone; the medium is changing. Syndicates are dwindling. The industry has changed dramatically and at warp speed.

THB: What do you hope people take away from your books and columns?

LB: I hope they just laugh or smile on a dreary day.

Find Abbey Doyle on Facebook and @heraldbulletin on Twitter, or call 640-4805.

1
Text Only
Entertainment
  • FEA HB0416 Reno Sweeney Review: Classic Cole Porter tunes in 'Anything Goes' Light-hearted entertainment reigns at Beef and Boards Dinner Theatre as the stage is filled with sparkling costumes, quick stepping and even a little slapstick thrown into the mix. “Anything Goes,” now playing through May 11, may be a musical celebrating its 80th anniversary, but the humor is not lost on modern audiences.

    April 16, 2014 3 Photos

  • 'Grace's Magic' to help Second Harvest Ball State graduate Cindee Cox is the author of “Grace’s Magic,” a children’s book geared around helping others and the community in which they live.

    April 14, 2014

  • 'Hunger Games' top winner at MTV Movie Awards

    "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire" earned the prize for best film at Sunday night's MTV Movie Awards, besting even top Oscar winner "12 Years a Slave."

    April 13, 2014

  • NWS - HB0414 - Digital library- JC Alexandria library going digital Alexandria-Monroe Public Library using new digital program to make borrowing the latest books and movies easier than ever.

    April 13, 2014 1 Photo

  • NWS - HB0414 - gourmet sampler1 Special Olympian headlines 30th Gourmet Sampler

    Friends came by the table of Paul Porcaro on Sunday, asking if he was going to sing again this year.

    April 13, 2014 4 Photos

  • Drama camp to perform 'The Chronicles of Narnia' This summer, local drama director Darlene Lee plans to embark on an adventure into "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe."

    April 12, 2014

  • Nirvana, Kiss lead new class in Rock Hall of Fame

    Nirvana, who set music and fashion trends with their grunge sound but whose career was cut short by leader Kurt Cobain's suicide 20 years ago, led inductees into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on Thursday.

    April 11, 2014

  • Reservoir group conducting survey In an effort to get a pulse on how local residents are reacting to the proposed Mounds Lake reservoir, the Corporation for Economic Development is asking for comments through an online survey.

    April 11, 2014

  • NWS - HB0411 - gourmet sampler file Gourmet Sampler to feature new attractions People may be coming for the food, but this weekend’s Gourmet Sampler is going to be all about the athletes. This year's edition is adding new events to raise even more money for the Madison County Special Olympics.

    April 10, 2014 1 Photo

  • Tim Wilson benefit set for May 9 The Bob & Tom Tim Wilson Benefit Show will benefit the Tim Wilson Memorial Fund and celebrate his comedic legacy.

    April 10, 2014

AP Video
Parade
Magazine

Click HERE to read all your Parade favorites including Hollywood Wire, Celebrity interviews and photo galleries, Food recipes and cooking tips, Games and lots more.