The Herald Bulletin

October 23, 2013

Early snow causes inconveniences, few hazards

Early snow causes inconveniences, few hazards

By Traci L. Moyer
The Herald Bulletin

ANDERSON, Ind. — The first snow of the season was not the soft, fluffy stuff children dream about.

It was a heavy, wet and, in some places, icy snow that blanketed cars, sidewalks and driveways.

According to the Anderson Light & Power website, 10 power outages in the area occurred about 11:30 a.m., resulting in 318 customers without power. An ALP official said trees falling on power lines caused most of the outages.

Dave Welsh, owner of Welsh Landscape Co. & Greenhouse, 3575 Alexandria Pike in Anderson, said the snow did not hurt his business.

“I still have some products outside,” he said. “But we had really already started to wrap it up for the year. We just had a little bit of snow – maybe an inch. By late morning it had all melted.”

Ken Scheeringa, of the Indiana State Climate Office in West Lafayette, said Anderson is ahead of schedule when it comes to its first snowfall. The first measurable flurry normally arrives about Nov. 19.

Wednesday morning's weather came close to breaking the record for a first snowfall in the Madison County area, according to Scheeringa. He said the local record for an early snowfall came on Oct. 19, 1989.

The early snow isn't necessarily a sign of a snowy winter, Scheeringa said.

“It’s difficult to make a seasonal prediction on one event,” he said. “December of 1989 was very cold – but there was not much snow. It really just depends on what is going on in the Pacific Ocean and what we see with the Arctic circle.”

Mark Dahmer, a meteorologist for the Indianapolis National Weather Service, said unofficial measurements of Wednesday's snowfall were 1-1.5 inches. He said there will be a slight warm-up in the next week and, while there is another cold front on the horizon, it appears it will be too warm for accumulation.

“We had an early-season snow dump a little bit on us, but we are trending back to normal,” he said.

Dahmer said most forecasts are calling for a normal winter.

“Typically for us, a normal weather winter is about 25 to 26 inches of snow around the Indianapolis area,” he said.

For some people, any snow is too much.

“I’m not looking forward to winter in general – whether it is mild or hard,” Welsh said.

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