The Herald Bulletin

Afternoon Update

Local News

August 19, 2013

Daleville man frustrated with Scatterfield Road traffic signals

ANDERSON, Ind. — What driver hasn’t experienced this moment of intense automotive frustration?

You’re the fifth car queued up at a traffic light to make a left turn. The light turns green. You’re on your way.

The first car gets through, and then three more. By the time you reach the intersection, though, the light’s turned yellow, then quickly red.

And you’re stuck for another three- to four-minute cycle — that seems like an eternity — raging at the traffic light gods.

Daleville resident Monte Clymer has experienced that frustration at Anderson’s busiest intersection: Scatterfield Road and 53rd Street.

He believes there’s a significant traffic light timing or sequencing problem in both the eastbound and westbound left-turn lanes, that must only get a lot worse during the morning and evening rush hour, or when horse racing or a concert ends at Hoosier Park Racing & Casino.

He said that similar timing problems exist at Charles Street and Scatterfield, and further north at 38th Street and Scatterfield Road.

“The time of the green is just not long enough,” Clymer said on Monday. “Whatever the traffic is now, it’s only going to get worse.”

Because Scatterfield Road officially is a state highway, all traffic lights along the route are controlled by the Indiana Department of Transportation.

Harry Maginity, media relations director for INDOT’s Greenfield District, which includes Madison County, said he was not aware of any specific problems or complaints about traffic signal problems at 53rd and Scatterfield, but promised to bring that possibility to the attention of district traffic engineers.

He said it could be several days before a technician is dispatched to investigate if there is a problem with the traffic signal.

Anderson City Engineer Mike Spyers said traffic lights in the city are computer-controlled and synchronized to optimize traffic flow. Most systems also have sensors embedded in the pavement that can trigger traffic lights. Sometimes, though, these sensors can be damaged, potentially throwing off traffic light timing.

He could not say if that is the case with the traffic lights that Clymer is concerned about, or even if there is a problem with timing at the 53rd Street traffic signals.

Like Stu Hirsch on Facebook and follow him @stuhirsch on Twitter, or call 640-4861.

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