The Herald Bulletin

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September 4, 2013

Attorney general files complaint against Community Health Center medical director

Allegations follow Drug Enforcement Administration inquiry

ANDERSON, Ind. — The Indiana Attorney General’s Office has filed a six-count complaint against Dr. Frank Campbell, medical director of the Madison County Community Health Center, alleging he violated state law by allowing physician assistants to prescribe pain medicine to patients.

The complaint was filed with the Medical Licensing Board of Indiana, and follows an investigation conducted by the Drug Enforcement Administration that began in early May.

In an interview with DEA agents on May 10, Campbell said he allowed two physician assistants, Mathew and Regan Taylor, to write prescriptions for controlled substances using his federal permit, and Indiana Controlled Substance Registration, which included Schedule II drugs, according to the attorney general’s filing.

Campbell pre-signed prescription pads the Taylors used to dispense pain medication after they examined patients. According to the complaint, approximately 14,000 prescriptions were written that way in 2012, which were filed under Campbell’s federal and state permits.

The investigation was initiated at a time when both federal and state officials are seeking to curb the abuse of prescription drugs and the activities of so-called pill mills. No criminal charges have been filed against Campbell or the Taylors.

Schedule II narcotics, according to a Department of Justice website, include hydromorphone (Dilaudid), methadone (Dolophine), oxycodone (OxyContin and Percocet), and morphine, opium and codeine.

Schedule II stimulants include amphetamine (Dexedrine and Adderall), and methylphenidate (Ritalin). The latter drugs are frequently prescribed to treat attention deficit hyperactive disorder in both children and adults.

Medication in this class of drugs has a high potential for abuse, which may lead to severe psychological or physical dependence, according to the website.

In response to the DEA’s investigation, the Community Health Center reviewed and enhanced the center’s already robust management programs for patients with chronic pain, officials said.

Anthony J. Malone, president and CEO of the center, said on Wednesday that the health center for years has been a leader in establishing strict procedures in the dispensing of potentially addictive pain and stimulant drugs, and is working with state officials and newly established medical groups.

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