The Herald Bulletin

Evening Update

Sports

February 6, 2013

Rick Bramwell: Times have changed

When I was a teen, Delmar Lyons and I would walk the campus sidewalk at Anderson University with a beagle on a leash and shotguns on our shoulders. Nobody called 911 or gave us a second look, but things soon changed.

One day, while hunting between Alexandria Pike and Scatterfield Road, Delmar lifted up a piece of tin, in a fence row, behind a new house. The old man pulled out a .22-caliber pistol and shot a hiding rabbit. A man came running out of the house screaming that his kids had just witnessed this atrocity and would be forever scarred.

I grew up enjoying the hunt; it was a good way to put meat on the table and a lot more fun than plucking chickens. Nowadays, not so many are raised hunting and shooting guns.

Several times a year conservation organizations ask me to help promote their fundraising banquets. I’m glad to do it because the funds benefit wildlife and often go to youth outdoor related programs. One thing all these fundraisers have in common are guns.

Holly Miller, a great writing professor at AU, once told me to never assume the reader knew what I was talking about. It has come to my attention that some of you have a misconception of these wildlife benefiting banquets.

The banquet committees are made up of sportsmen and women who want to restore habitat for elk, deer, turkey, ducks, etc. The NRA banquets raise money for shooting ranges, youth programs, and to defend our Second Amendment rights.

People who go to these fundraisers usually spend from $150 to $5,000. They are folks who want to preserve wildlife and hunting for future generations. For instance, we now have large enough populations of elk to hunt in Kentucky and Pennsylvania. Elk populations are growing in several other states east of the Mississippi. In every instance the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation had a hand in the restocking programs.

Each banquet has a licensed gun dealer, on hand, to run background checks. Fail the federal background check and you do not get a gun. Also, there is no ammunition present at these banquets.

When I go to Subway, in Pendleton, after a workout at MyTime Fitness, I always feel safer when I see a couple of cops dining in. I will feel just as safe at the Elk Banquet Saturday night. Call Rich 765-215-3478 for tickets.

Ducks Unlimited will be holding a membership and volunteer drive at its booth during the Deer, Turkey and Waterfowl Expo at the Indianapolis Boat Show, Feb. 15-17.

This year there will be a DU Banquet held on Friday, Feb. 15, at the State Farm/Bartos building with food and entertainment. The “Great Gun Giveaway” will be featured at this dinner. You can buy your dinner tickets online by clicking the “buy tickets” button at www.duck.org.

Rick Bramwell’s weekly outdoors column appears on Thursdays.

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