The Herald Bulletin

Evening Update

State News

March 11, 2014

Gay married couples could pay more for tax filings

INDIANAPOLIS - Conflicting state and federal policies will likely cost Indiana same-sex couples more when they file their tax returns this year, experts say.

The Internal Revenue Service decided to recognize gay marriages after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down sections of the Defense of Marriage Act. But about half of the nation's states have not adopted the federal tax policy, and a measure introduced in the General Assembly last week is on track to ensure Indiana does not either.

Department of Revenue spokesman Bob Dittmer said staff analyses show that keeping the current policy shouldn't cost the state or individuals more on actual taxes, but lawyers and accountants say the price tag for filing likely will be higher.

The split means Indiana same-sex couples who choose to take advantage of the new federal policy will have to prepare five tax returns this year: one jointly for federal taxes, two each to file separately for the state and two mock federal returns with the split assets, said John McGowan, who heads the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender practice at Northern Trust. The mock federal returns would be the basis for the separate state returns.

Each one can take time, and money, to prepare.

"That's one of the true burdens that same-sex couples face when they're living in a non-recognition state," McGowan said. "There are tangible costs associated with that."

Indianapolis resident Tim Orient said he expects to pay nearly twice the previous fees for his tax returns this year now that his marriage to his husband is recognized by the federal government. He said he spent about $400 on tax preparations for himself last year.

"We're very frustrated with all this," Orient said.

Splitting incomes for the state and joining them for the federal filings also could mean same-sex couples in states that don't recognize their marriages will be flagged for audits because each spouse will only report a fraction of their combined income to the state, said Anthony Infanti, a University of Pittsburgh law professor who specializes in tax issues for same-sex couples.

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