The Herald Bulletin

Evening Update

State News

October 6, 2013

Woman rescued as heavy rains hit southern Indiana

CORYDON, Ind. — Cars skidded off Interstate 65 after hydroplaning and a woman needed to be rescued from her stalled car on a flooded road Sunday after more than 5 inches of rain fell across parts of southern Indiana.

The National Weather Service issued a flash flood watch through Sunday night for Clark, Floyd, Jefferson and Scott counties after forecasting periods of moderate to heavy rain would persist through much of the day, dropping as much as 2 additional inches of rain on already saturated ground.

Weather service data posted online indicated more than 5 inches of rain fell across parts of southern Indiana during a 24-hour period that ended at 7 a.m. Sunday.

Indiana State Police reported some motorists skidded off I-65 on Sunday morning north of Seymour after their vehicles hydroplaned. No injuries were reported and the vehicles were pulled back onto the highway, Sgt. Paul Adams of the Versailles post told The Courier-Journal.

In Clarksville, rising waters forced residents of an apartment complex to move their cars and trucks to higher ground, but police did not expect the conditions to force anyone from their apartments, police Col. Mark Palmer said.

"We're just watching Silver Creek" and an area near the Ohio River south of Indiana 62, Palmer said.

Volunteer firefighters waded into water 2 feet deep on Sunday morning south of Corydon and helped a female motorist to safety, conservation officer Jim Hash said.

Responders believed the woman didn't realize how high the water was and thought her compact car could make it through what appeared to be a light ponding area.

"I think the lady got panicked" and caused the car to stall out, Hash said.

Conservation officers and first responders in Harrison and Crawford counties were watching Indian Creek and Blue River because both streams tend to rise quickly in some locations, Hash said. Indian Creek "is close to being bank full" and more rain Sunday could push it out of its banks, he said.

Elsewhere in Harrison County, a few trees fell over roadways overnight but were cleared away, said Greg Reas, the county's emergency management director.

"There are a dozen or so places (where water blocks roads) that we'll need to keep an eye on," Reas said.

 

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