An Indiana man accused of producing and sending around the world pornographic images of children under age 4, including infants, pleaded guilty Monday in a case that prosecutors said was one of the largest of its kind in state history.

David R. Bostic, 23, of Bloomington, pleaded guilty in Indianapolis to 65 criminal counts, and as many as 20 people who received the images have been arrested in the U.S., the United Kingdom, Serbia, Sweden and the Netherlands, U.S. Attorney Joe Hogsett said at a news conference.

Prosecutors said Bostic could spend the rest of his life in prison. Sentencing has not been scheduled.

Bostic has been held since last November, when FBI agents and other authorities searched his computer and found child pornography, prosecutors said. Authorities said that over about two years, Bostic produced sexually explicit images of a 4-year-old boy and four girls who were between 2-months-old and 3-years-old.

"We used the information on his computer to carefully catch as many people as we could," said Steve DeBrota, one of the prosecutors handling the case.

Charged along with Bostic as part of the conspiracy to traffic child pornography were men from London, Pennsylvania and South Carolina. Officials could not discuss others involved because sections of the case remain under seal.

Hogsett said the case was unique because investigators went after people with whom the images were shared, not just the producer.

The crime was a picture that was shared across the Internet, so "the crime therefore is spread around the world," Hogsett said. He said investigators worked hard to chase down people in several countries "who would victimize children."

Bostic's attorney, William Marsh, said the case wasn't the most serious child pornography case ever filed in the district in part because it didn't involve molestation of a child by an adult. He declined further comment.

An indictment alleges the group shared images primarily through email.

Bostic pleaded guilty under an agreement that didn't contain a recommended sentence, DeBrota said. Instead, both sides will argue in court for what they believe is appropriate.

The arrest resulted from work by a task force on Internet crimes against children involving federal, state and local agencies.

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