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Greg Winkler, executive director of the Anderson Economic Development Department, said Thursday that there is a potential partnership for the development of the property at the corner of Nichol and Arrow avenues.

ANDERSON — The city of Anderson is working with a potential buyer for the property at the intersection of Nichol and Arrow avenues.

The property is located on the southeast corner of the intersection and has been previously used as a nightclub, restaurant and convenience store. It has been vacant for several years.

Greg Winkler, executive director of the Anderson Economic Development Department, informed members of the Anderson Community Development Corp. (ACDC) on Thursday that there is a potential partnership for the development of the property.

Winkler said the current owners of the property are willing to sell the parcel at a reasonable price and that the ACDC would not incur any cost.

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management would pay for the cleanup if it was owned by a government agency, he said.

Winkler said there is a potential buyer interested in the location if the buildings would be demolished before purchase.

Another potential option for a buyer is the Anderson Redevelopment Commission.

The ACDC is exploring several options to obtain federal grant funds to return some of the 175 properties obtained through the federally funded Blight Elimination Program and city funds.

Kevin Sulc, chairman of the ACDC, said federal funds could be available for elimination of commercial blight and to assist small business startups.

“There are plenty of opportunities,” he said. “In addition to providing housing, a grant from the U.S. Housing and Urban Development administration could fund small business startups.”

Winkler said the city has to do a better job of reaching out to minority communities and informing them of small business opportunities.

Sulc said ACDC would probably start applying for grants in 2020.

Lelia Kelley, director of the Anderson Community Development Department, said many of the properties owned by ACDC are in federally designated opportunity zones.

The zones provide tax incentives for people willing to make investments in the area.

“We can start economic development in the opportunity zones,” Kelley said. “We can work in those areas.”

She said the potential HUD grant allows local agencies to start an endowment fund in which $3 in federal dollars are available for every $1 raised.

“It will fund the ACDC for the long term and sustain the organization and programs,” Kelley said. “It provides an opportunity for others to provide funding to the endowment.”

The ACDC board voted to join the Madison County Chamber of Commerce as a way to inform community leaders of their redevelopment efforts in the areas of affordable housing, economic development, education and community health needs.

Follow Ken de la Bastide on Twitter

@KendelaBastide, or call 765-640-4863.

Senior Reporter covering Anderson and Madison County government, politics and auto racing for The Herald Bulletin. Has been working as a journalist in central Indiana since 1977.

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