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All 25,599 of you who voted in Madison County ...

And the dozens who worked at the polls ...

And the 18 volunteers, plus staff and party representatives who worked in the county clerk’s election office ...

And County Clerk Olivia Pratt ...

And all of the candidates, whether you won or lost ...

All of you stand up now, and take a deep, well-deserved bow.

Despite the coronavirus pandemic that left us homebound for weeks and delayed the primary, originally scheduled for May 5, to June 2 ...

Despite the needless teeth-gnashing about the legitimacy of mail-in voting ...

Despite legitimate concerns about the possibility of disease transmission at the polls ...

Despite the George Floyd protest movement’s grip on the nation’s collective consciousness ...

Despite all that, Madison County’s primary went smoothly, with few problems reported at the polls Tuesday and few public complaints about mail-in ballots and early in-person voting.

The polls closed at 6 p.m. and within three hours, Pratt and her office staff, official party representatives and volunteers, had counted all of the ballots and posted results on the election office’s web page.

Madison County has had problems in some past elections when equipment has failed. This time around, we were all done counting while some other Indiana counties were still working through the day Wednesday to try to figure out their totals.

Some folks suspected the 2020 primary would draw a smaller turnout than past presidential primaries. After all, the nominees for president have already, in effect, been chosen, and there wasn’t a gubernatorial race in either party.

But, boy, did Madison County voters show that they are adaptable and that they want to engage in the democratic process.

Almost 29% of registered voters in the county cast ballots, up considerably from the 20% standard that we’ve come to expect. Neighboring counties Delaware and Grant County had 23% and 26% turnout, respectively.

Granted, 7 of every 10 registered voters in Madison County chose not to cast ballots in the primary, meaning that too many remain apathetic about their role as a citizen.

But a lot of their neighbors voted, even when it wasn’t easy or convenient, and even when there were lots of reasons not to. Those who filled out a ballot recognized that nominees for crucial positions — U.S. representative, county commissioner, judge and others — would be selected in the primary, and they wanted their voices to be heard.

It bodes well for a good voter turnout — by mail and in person — in November’s general election, which will help shape the direction of our county, state and nation for years to come.

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